Tag: archives

Things they don’t tell you in book conservation grad school…

Things they don’t tell you in book conservation grad school…

Things they don’t tell you in book conservation grad school: one day your job will be to make a housing for a large papier-mâché chicken puppet.

Some scenes from the move of our archives and special collections…

Some scenes from the move of our archives and special collections…

Some scenes from the move of our archives and special collections: empty shelves contrasted with full book trays on their way to offsite storage. My library will be undergoing a massive renovation early this coming year, and I am the one managing the logistics involved […]

Tape of low moral fiber

Tape of low moral fiber

If you ever need some scotch tape or masking tape in my conservation lab, this is where you’ll find it.  

Double-sided tape (used for all sorts of conservation housings) is in the “Tape Tape” drawer.

Found in the archives and sealed with a kiss!

Found in the archives and sealed with a kiss!

While making photocopies of some moldy archives material, my student worker noticed that someone (presumably the person whose papers these are) had used this document to blot their lipstick. 💋💄

If you love it, don’t laminate it!

If you love it, don’t laminate it!

Apparently our first university archivist/historian was a big fan of lamination. This just one of a couple hundred volumes containing some of our earliest university records and history that were meticulously laminated. I cannot accurately describe how aghast I must have looked while examining these. […]

Mold Remediation

Mold Remediation

Some before and after photos of a recent mold remediation treatment I’ve been working on. It’s a collection of more than a hundred architectural drawings, paintings, and photographic reproductions that were damaged by mold prior to their acquisition by the library.

 Fortunately, most of the mold damage is on the edges of the supports or on the mats, and not all the items in this group were affected by mold. However, vacuuming each item with our special HEPA filter vacuum in the conservation lab’s fume hood takes anywhere from 5-15 minutes, depending on how stubborn the mold is. Additional cleaning was also done with grated eraser crumbs and a plastic eraser, when the paper support boards and mats were strong enough. More aesthetically-focused treatments such as stain removal will not be undertaken at this time, as the staining only affects the mats and support boards, not the images themselves.

Unfortunately, not all of the drawings were cleaned as successfully as others, and out of this group there’s still 10 larger paintings that will need more intense treatment. At least they all physically fit IN the fume hood, so thank goodness for small mercies.

Post ID: 5618

(via https://vine.co/v/eZ6OAdU31OO) Doing some spray deacidification with our Bookkeeper system here in the conservation lab. (Source: https://vine.co/)

Follow Friday for Preservation Week

Please reblog! Learn more about conservation and preservation by following these fine folks on Tumblr and other sites such as Twitter, Facebook, Vine, and blogs (link goes to a Google Doc spreadsheet). Are you a conservator or preservation professional? Are you a pre-program or graduate […]

Free Preservation 101 Textbook

Just in time for Preservation Week 2015, NEDCC is pleased to announce the online textbook for Preservation 101: Preservation Basics for Paper and Media Collections. This free resource provides a basic introduction to the concepts and standards used to build an effective preservation program and includes discussion of preservation policies, building and environment, care and handling of collection materials, reformatting, emergency preparedness, and conservation practices.

This newly revised edition includes expanded information on caring for audiovisual collections, digital preservation and copyright, and emergency management. The textbook includes activities and readings designed to aid institutions and private individuals performing their own preservation planning. Preservation 101 has a long history as an authoritative and succinct reference for professionals, students, and individuals.
The freely available Preservation 101 textbook is the foundation for NEDCC’s interactive online course on general preservation topics. A series of 10 live webinars builds on self-paced study, using assigned readings and other resources to supplement classroom discussion.

 Learn More.

Preservation 101: Preservation Basics for Paper and Media Collections was developed with funding from the Institute of Museum and Library Services and is supported in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities.  Designed as an introductory course, it grounds participants in the theory and practice of preserving library and archival collections.

Free Preservation Week Webinars from ALA

conservethis: Join us in celebrating Preservation Week by attending this free webinar series! April 28th – Moving Image Preservation 101Sponsored by HF Group & George Blood, LP This presentation covers the basic composition and history of film and video technology, particularly as it relates to […]