Tag: tape is evil

Tape of low moral fiber

Tape of low moral fiber

If you ever need some scotch tape or masking tape in my conservation lab, this is where you’ll find it.   Double-sided tape (used for all sorts of conservation housings) is in the “Tape Tape” drawer.

Library Book + Dog + Tape = Bad Idea

This was a book that was damaged by a dog, and “fixed” with packing tape by a patron. And this is also why the staff at the library will often stress that patrons should not attempt their own repairs of library books. The “repair” often does […]

Post ID: 6753

conservethis:

What tape does to paper. You can see my fingers through the tape, which has made the paper translucent.

Here’s a bit more of an explanation about what’s happening between the tape and the paper in the photos above:

“A good example to illustrate examination and treatment methods is an artwork on paper onto which a rubber based cellophane tape has been applied. A classification system is used to determine the degree of degradation of the tape, a factor that is critical to planning the removal strategy. In stage one, called the induction stage, the tape seems healthy. The adhesive is functioning well, the carrier is stable, and no discoloration is apparent. In stage two, called the oxidative stage, the carrier is still present, but the adhesive is stringy and overly sticky. During this stage volatiles such as plasticizers are lost, and the
rubber elastomer is actively oxidizing. The tape may be discolored from the cumulative effect of a number of chemical changes. In stage three, called the crosslinked stage, the adhesive has failed, and the carrier is gone or will come off easily. The adhesive is brittle, highly discolored, and the paper to which it is affixed is translucent from penetration of the adhesive. After the stage of deterioration is determined, other observations are made, such as whether there is plasticizer migration or dimensional change in the carrier. Microscopic examination can show if underlying media have been affected, and crossed polar viewing can help determine the carrier material.”
-Quoted from “Pressure sensitive tapes and our cultural heritage” by Elissa M. O’Loughlin, Associate Conservator, The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, MD 

Post ID: 6763

What tape does to paper. You can see my fingers through the tape, which has made the paper translucent.

Conservation Conversations // Adhesives in Library and Archives: A Colloquium Review (Part 1)

Conservation Conversations // Adhesives in Library and Archives: A Colloquium Review (Part 1) Last Friday, the first Biennial Conservation Colloquium was held at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Four conservators traveled to Urbana from the UK and across the country to speak about their research or practical experiences […]

When someone uses the phrase “archival tape”

image

No, really, an “archival quality” pressure-sensitive tape does not exist.

Post ID: 7615

I count three different types of tape used to repair this book. Can one of you top this?

Museum Mind Games: Adhesive Tape & Conservators Edition

whenyouworkatamuseum: Fact: conservators hate scotch tape. It is their nemesis. When you ask a conservator for a piece of tape, they make this face:  And if you “innocently” mention that you’re going to use that tape to fasten something to a old, fragile object, they […]

They did WHAT?

When I hear the phrase “we fixed it with some tape”…

image

Post ID: 7828

Someone “fixed” this with some poorly placed pieces of double-sided tape. Sigh.